Edutainment – Chat shows in lessons

Basis:

I’d had a similar idea to this a while back, but had never been able to get any further than that, an idea. It was my old pal Paul Taylor (@ticktock80) who put me onto Kate Bancroft (@klbancroft88) at Penistone Grammar School, who then inspired me to try the lesson I’m about to describe.

Kate is famed at their place for her innovative use of chat-shows/reality TV in creating engaging lessons. I’d read a few bits and pieces about her lessons and started to think more seriously about how I could do something similar. Another old pal, Jon Nicholls (@JonNicholls81) had mentioned on Twitter that he had an idea in the pipeline and this sealed it for me – I was definitely going to give it a whirl.

I had already decided on my reasons for using this kind of delivery method with my AS group; for a while I’ve been concerned about their struggles with extended questions – especially where they are asked to “critically evaluate/analyse/discuss”. I would use this idea to help the kids generate argument, discussion and highlight opposing viewpoints.

Guest Spot: Kate’s Experiences – AS PE: Rational Recreation

Jeremy Kyle definitely got my class buzzing about learning! They took on roles of the working class and it was fantastic to see them using so many key points that we had learnt in lesson during the ‘arguments’! Luckily we had a bouncer to step in when it really kicked off between the couple over the amount of time that he was working in the factories and then watching football on the ‘half day’ Saturday.

 
This particular group got so into character that they did the filming in one take, with no script…and amazingly still hit so many relevant learning points!! Definitely up there with my best lessons. What kids come up with when you give them the chance amazes me!
 
It really was a hit with my class and I can’t wait to do my next one!”
After a recommendation like that, it was easy to see the huge potential of planning something very similar.
My Lesson:
The lesson focus was on the impact of different factors on Coronary Heart Diseases. I knew I wanted the kids to answer a 10-marker for homework, so I picked the rather challenging “Critically evaluate the effect of lifestyle factors on CHD’s”.
In my planning for the lesson I decided that I’d try and keep things quite structured, rather than go all-out and turn things completely over to the kids to arrange. I wanted each pupil in the group to have a set role/persona and I also wanted to give them the opportunity to plan their response to the homework question during the lesson.
The Plan:
I spent a bit of time looking at the ability of kids in the group along with their personalities. Once I’d got my head round this, I tried to match up kids with appropriate roles. As I’m sure is the case in most groups, there is a good mix of geniuses, numpties, performing seals and kids so introverted you alsmost have to pay to hear their thoughts.
roles and jobs – document. Names in red were the kids I gave the more challenging roles and responsibilities. I emailed each pupil with their own role, with instructions to research their part and, if necessary, liaise with any others mentioned in their part. I gave them a good few days in order to ensure nobody was left with nothing to say.
I used an A3 version of this sheet Exercise and CHD 10 mark planning sheet
As a connect activity, I showed a compilation of the more extreme clips from the show and encouraged the group to attempt to replicate it in their efforts.
I set scene at the start of the lesson in character as Jezza, posed the question they kids would be answering and introduced to group to the horrible charver who they’d be watching/speaking to during the show. He was a guest from a previous episode of the show and was a disgusting looking chap. After hearing from him, I introduced our resident twins who were eating at McDonald’s 3 times each day and they got the ball rolling. In my role as Jeremy, I managed who would be speaking and in what general order. My homemade microphone and boom served as a visual aid to let everyone know who had the floor. Obviously if debate ensued, the structure opened up and a bit of organised madness raged.
The Good Bits:
The main positive of the lesson was the level of engagement. The kids genuinely seemed to love the idea that we were doing something a bit different. Had I simply set some preparatory homework as I often do, I’m sure plenty of the kids would have gone through the motions the night before, found out the relevant information in the course textbook and mindlessly copied something down as a means of answer. However, because each pupil had a differrent homework prep task, they put in some real effort. Some kids had generated pages of notes and scripts. One lad, who played the obese man in his 50’s, had brought in bags of crisps and chocolates to eat throughout his part, whilst wheezing away and simulating chest pains.
The quality of delivery from the kids was unreal. The “doctors” really had a pompous, arrogant air about them and at one point, started arguing with each other as a grudging relationship was hinted-at in their role descriptors. My “antagonist” did a great job of winding people up and making controversial, sweeping statements when other characters were trying to explain their points. We had a couple of characters thrown off the show.
The quality of information shared was outstanding. Rather than simply being just a bit of fun and chaos, the kids had really gone to town on becoming an “expert” in their specific field. There was stuff kids had brought from their Biology backgrounds (I’m lucky in that 16/19 kids do both PE and Bio).
After the “show” had finished, we allowed time for kids to go and find an “expert” in whichever field they still had questions. For example, if you still weren’t sure what the implications of HDL and LDL cholesterol were, you could go and speak to Dan and Luke who could tell you. This was propbaly my favourite bit.
The Bad Bits:
On the day of the lesson, I was already suffering from the Gastro-Intestinal infestation that put me out of school for the next 4 days. Basically I felt like shit. I was sweating like a pig and my guts were killing me. I found out the night before that 2 of my colleagues would be systematically taking kids out of the lesson to do their mock EPIP talks. This really didn’t help with continuity. I had been moved classrooms out of the block for the first lesson of the day, this meant that I had to leg it from main school back to PE to dump my gear, then peg it back outside for my break duty and then back to PE for my lesson. This didn’t allow me time to get changed into my suit. I was gutted about this bit. Having rushed around at the start of the lesson and struggled with the growing nausea, I completely forgot to pick up the 4 video cameras I’d charged up that morning for my film crew to use. Idiot. It was a bit like I’d planned the lesson for over a week and it was going tits-up before my eyes. Once I was chasing my tail, I felt I’d lost a bit of organisation along the way.
Overall:
Aside from being a bit annoyed with myself at forgetting the cameras and feeling pretty minging throughout the whole lesson, I was dead chuffed with my 1st effort at this type of lesson. There was clear differentiation in the roles kids assumed; the planning sheets and the notes the kids had prepared beforehand showed the progress made throughout the lesson and engagement was through the roof.
Yes, things could have been much better. I would certainly recommend getting more input from the kids in terms of structure of the show – I’d either let things be much more free flowing, or use a panel of kids to direct/produce the show in future. I might even let it go wild and then book the IT rooms (some expert advice) and then let the kids edit a revision video from the raw footage.
I’m already thinking about the next one. I fancy doing a “Question Time” themed show with kids coming up with their own issues and posers for a panel who would be answering in character. That’s as far as I’ve got with it I’m afraid.
The 10 mark question homework was handed in yesterday. At first glance, they look to be pretty good. I’m actually looking forward to marking them – which quite frankly is a bloody miracle.
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